Blog

Welcome to our Blog! We post weekly articles written on a variety of topics from a variety of people, including our staff, volunteers, community members, and our parents and youth. The Voices of our Blog are opinion pieces, reflecting the diverse experiences and viewpoints of our community. These articles are not meant to represent the views of everyone at FCNI, our Board of Directors and staff, or present a definitive policy statement, but are designed to be informative and thought-provoking.

Precious Resources

by
Tasha Farmer, Emergency Shelter Program Supervisor
August, 11, 2021 -

Foster parents are a vital resource to our community. They open up their hearts and homes to help youth who, for one reason or another, are unable to live with their biological family. They provide safety and stability to youth in need and truly are remarkable individuals. So what happens when there are not enough foster parents? In this piece, Emergency Shelter Program Supervisor, Tasha Farmer, explains what happens to foster youth who do not have a foster parent and the harsh reality they face when there are no homes available.

The Practice of Caring – Part 4

A Discussion on Social Justice
by
Jim Roberts
August, 4, 2021 -

To no fault of their own, youth exiting the Foster Care System are more susceptible to homelessness, depression, and unemployment. Without support, they are often unable to access basic care or life needs, and the implications of that can be devastating. At Family Care Network, we believe all Foster Youth deserve to be treated with respect and be provided every opportunity for success as any other youth in society. The Family Care Network is in the business of providing Social Justice, i.e., what is necessary for the health, welfare, maintenance and protection of our most vulnerable populations; victims of neglect, abuse and social injustice. Read Part 4 in our series, The Practice of Caring, by our CEO/Founder Jim Roberts to hear a brief history of foster care, the Independent Living Program, and how we support Transitional Aged Youth establish pathways to self-sufficiency and mental wellbeing. 

The Practice of Caring: a Discussion on Social Justice Part 3

A Discussion on Social Justice
by
Jim Roberts, CEO/Founder
July, 28, 2021 -

The Family Care Network's primary constellation of activities designed for one significant purpose–Treatment and Healing. FCNI is in the business to provide what is necessary for the health, welfare, maintenance and protection of our most vulnerable populations--victims of neglect, abuse and social injustice. Therefore, Social Injustice is a very present and devastating force within our culture.The foundation of all of our activities is rooted in the Social Justice principles that all people are entitled to equal rights, opportunities and treatment. In the third installment of The Practice of Caring, our CEO Jim Roberts takes a deeper look at Trauma, Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE), and a summary of some of the treatment modalities we use to address childhood trauma to promote healing and Social Justice to build a strong, resilient community. 

“A Means to Make an Impact”: A Youth Partner’s Story

by
Crystal, FCNI Youth Partner
July, 21, 2021 -

Meet Crystal, one our our incredible youth partners. In her life, Crystal has experienced neglect, and physical and emotional abuse. Through hard work, time, and working with various service providers Crystal has developed an understanding of how to form and maintain boundaries, how to develop and engage in self-care strategies, and how to manage her trauma. Today, Crystal uses her experiences to support families, children, and youth as a Youth Partner within our Family Services Program. Read her full story and how our Full-Service Partnership (FSP) program has impacted her life today! 

Easton’s Story: FSP Impact

by
Sarah Davenport, FCNI Director

Easton, his mom and his two younger brothers were facing an uphill battle. The family had recently left Easton’s dad due to his ongoing physical and emotional abuse which meant they had to flee their home. While they had found safety at a local shelter for survivors of domestic violence, their unhealed trauma and unmet mental health needs impacted their interactions --making communicating and healing together difficult.

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