Tag: trauma informed care

Ashlee’s Journey

by
Sarah Davenport, FCNI Director with special contribution from Ashlee
September, 15, 2021 -

Sharing stories of recovery and personal journeys through care takes a great deal of courage and self-awareness on the part of the story-teller. They share these very personal words not wanting to elicit pity or sympathy, but, rather, in hopes that those who hear their words will be able to relate; that they will see their own struggles or the struggles of their loved ones reflected back at them through eyes of compassion and understanding. Sharing impact stories like these becomes a powerful dialog between those in our care and those who support that care. And we love igniting these kinds of conversations. 

We’d like to introduce you to Ashlee, a local mom of three who has been served through FCNI’s Bringing Families Home program, a program which houses homeless families as the last step in a family’s reunification plan. Below, Ashlee shares her journey in care and the impact of support in her and her children’s lives.  

The Practice of Caring

A Discussion on Social Justice
by
Jim Roberts
September, 1, 2021 -

All of us at the Family Care Network are incredibly grateful for the opportunity to provide for the health, welfare, maintenance, and protection of our most vulnerable populations: victims of neglect, abuse, and social injustice through our Practice of Caring–Social Justice at work. Working hand-in-hand with direct treatment services, delivered through multiple programs, is our passion and commitment to Prevention Services. Effective Social Justice is the prevention of neglect, abuse and injustice.  Read the 6th edition of "The Practice of Caring" to learn more about how we work to break the "cycle of trauma". 

The Practice of Caring–Part 5

A Discussion on Social Justice
by
Jim Roberts, CEO/Founder
August, 25, 2021 -

Homelessness has become a major social problem in every major US city, but also in many smaller, even rural areas; even here on the Central Coast. The youth we serve are the most at-risk of becoming homeless and FCNI works hard to provide housing accommodations to children, families, and youth in our care. CEO Jim Roberts, continues his discussion on Social Justice through the Family Care Network’s Practice of Caring as he breaks down the the treatment and skills necessary for the children, youth and families in our care to overcome all obstacles that might prevent them from living healthy, safe and productive lives. 

The Practice of Caring – Part 4

A Discussion on Social Justice
by
Jim Roberts
August, 4, 2021 -

To no fault of their own, youth exiting the Foster Care System are more susceptible to homelessness, depression, and unemployment. Without support, they are often unable to access basic care or life needs, and the implications of that can be devastating. At Family Care Network, we believe all Foster Youth deserve to be treated with respect and be provided every opportunity for success as any other youth in society. The Family Care Network is in the business of providing Social Justice, i.e., what is necessary for the health, welfare, maintenance and protection of our most vulnerable populations; victims of neglect, abuse and social injustice. Read Part 4 in our series, The Practice of Caring, by our CEO/Founder Jim Roberts to hear a brief history of foster care, the Independent Living Program, and how we support Transitional Aged Youth establish pathways to self-sufficiency and mental wellbeing. 

Easton’s Story: FSP Impact

by
Sarah Davenport, FCNI Director

Easton, his mom and his two younger brothers were facing an uphill battle. The family had recently left Easton’s dad due to his ongoing physical and emotional abuse which meant they had to flee their home. While they had found safety at a local shelter for survivors of domestic violence, their unhealed trauma and unmet mental health needs impacted their interactions --making communicating and healing together difficult. As an added stress, the Department of Social Services (DSS) had gotten involved in their situation due to ongoing safety issues between them. Easton and his brothers’ conflicts often escalated into violence, causing further trauma and harm. And the after-affects of domestic violence crippled Easton’s mom’s ability to intervene to keep them safe. This, as well as Easton’s mom increasing substance use, put their ability to stay together as a family at risk. 

Thank You, Foster Parents!

by
Jim Roberts, CEO/Founder
May, 26, 2021 -

For the better part of five decades, I have worked with Foster Parents. This group of extraordinary, unique individuals have certainly left an indelible, positive imprint on my life. I am not sure I have the skills to craft an appropriate expression of gratitude I have for those who have turned their homes and lives into sanctuaries, hospitals, safe havens, classrooms and sometimes even battlefields for our children and youth (and not without costs)... but here I go.

Taking Fostering a Step Further…

by
Maria Roberts, Foster Family Development Specialist
May, 13, 2021 -

I foster every day...I encourage and promote growth and healing in the lives of my bio children and in the youth who I mentor.  If I were just to tell you that I foster, you probably and most likely, would think that I am talking about “foster care.”  

A Special Calling

by
Jim Roberts, Founder/CEO
May, 6, 2021 -

As I have sojourned through seven decades of life, I have been in awe of the individuals who have been gifted with skills and abilities so beyond the norm. There are musicians, scientists, athletes, writers, artists; people in all walks of life who have a Special Calling to bless humanity with their unique gift. The contributions of the uniquely gifted make life rich, more meaningful and better for everyone. But, let’s not forget – each one of us has unique gifts and skills to contribute to the grand scope of life.

Process Makes Close to Perfect: A Wraparound Story

by
Sarah Davenport, FCNI Director
July, 8, 2020 -

For the first time in a long time, Cooper was afraid. A lifelong struggle with drug addiction had finally resulted in his 8 year-old daughter, Traci, being removed from his care and placed into a foster home for her safety. He knew he needed treatment or he'd risk losing his daughter forever, or even his own life. Recognizing that he’d hit rock bottom, Cooper committed himself fully to getting and staying clean. He had finally accepted the harsh reality that he’d only get to watch his daughter grow up and be a part of her life if he were sober and safe.

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